Baum Site 25: Baum’s Demise

Battle of Bennington. Engraving, 1874, from painting by Alonzo Chappel. Photo courtesy of the National Archives.

Battle of Bennington. Engraving, 1874, from painting by Alonzo Chappel. Photo courtesy of the National Archives.

After a stubborn defense of the hilltop defenses, Baum’s troops ran out of ammunition and the position was overrun. Squeezed from the east and west, the remainder of the forces fled down the hill and gathered in a field near the bend in the Walloomsac.  Baum gathered his men for a final stand, and led a saber charge. During the charge, Baum and Pfister were mortally wounded. They were carried to the Matthews House, and later buried along the Walloomsac. Baum’s gravesite is unknown, most likely it has been washed away by the meandering river, but a Vermont historic marker indicates the location of the Matthews House, just east of the Vermont border on Route 67.

At the bridge, where our Lieut. Col. Baum was standing, the cannon and volley fire had ceased. Capt. Dommes, who was covering our left flank and rear, was driven back with his few men and captured; we could see this quite well from our mountain. We were thus completely encircled.

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Riedesel Reaction to Bennington

Late August 1777, to the Duke (after Bennington) Fortune is often fickle, but especially so in war, a fact of which the following unpleasant event is a proof. Misfortune has fallen in an especial manner upon a portion of your troops, and that, too, after the glorious affair at Hubbardton.

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